shubbabang:

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consent is a hell of a thing aint it

(via ruby-brown)

9
kristinlikescats:

Most wonderful day
prettypasta:

Orecchiette with Brussels Sprouts, Walnuts, and Brown Butter

gr0sse:

KIDS REACT TO existentialism and the inevitability of death

(via eatingismyvirtue)

otfood:

Grilled Caprese Toast with Burrata Cheese Grilled Avocados
9
hi.
adventored:

nature
fredscience:

This Is Your Brain on Language: The Bouba/Kiki Effect
The nature of a word is completely arbitrary with respect to the object it names. The map is not the territory; the word is not the thing. Or, it’s not supposed to be. Consider the figure above. Given a pair of nonsense words, “bouba” and “kiki,” which would you choose to match the figures above? What about “maluma” and “takete”?
Most adults speaking most languages will choose “bouba” and “maluma” for the rounded shape and the other words for the pointed shape. The phenomenon has been replicated in a handful of studies in adults. Although it could be deeply rooted in the brain, it could also be a function of language learning. One group set out to establish which came first: language and a specific vocabulary (“bouba” looks and sounds like “round”), or the bouba/kiki effect mapping sounds to objects. In other words, could the bouba/kiki effect have an impact on how we learn language, or the other way around? They found that even small children, around age 2.5, would map words like “bouba” to rounded shapes and words like “kiki” to pointed shapes. The effect was possible in participants before extensive vocabulary development, which may indicate some sort of non-arbitrary sound-shape mapping in our brains. This could influence both the way we acquire language and the way it evolved. Some have suggested that such sound-shape correspondences may have helped the very first words get off the ground.
[read the study] [further reading] [2] [3] [4] [image]

glottalplosive:

You like [pəˈteɪtoʊ] and I like [pəˈtɑtoʊ]

You like [təˈmeɪtoʊ] and I like [təˈmɑtoʊ]

However, as a descriptivist, I respect linguistic diversity

And do not think that differences in pronunciation should be a reason for us to call the whole thing off.

chapmangamo:

"Greetings, aliens. Welcome to Planet… Terra.”
Available as a print
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